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«November 2015»

DirectQuery in Power BI Desktop

In the latest Power BI Desktop a new Preview features was released that now allows you to connect using DirectQuery to either SQL Server or Azure SQL Databases.  DirectQuery is a really neat feature that allows you to point to the live version of the data source rather than importing the data into a data model in Power BI Desktop. 

Normally when you want to get an updated dataset in the Power BI Desktop you would have to manually click the refresh button (this can be automated in the Power BI Service), which would initiate a full reimport of your data.  This refresh could take a variable amount of time depending on how much data your have.  For instance, if you’re refreshing a very large table you may be waiting quite a while to see the newly added data. 

With DirectQuery data imports are not required because you’re always looking at a live version of the data.  Let me show you how it works!

Turning on the DirectQuery Preview

Now, because DirectQuery is still in Preview you must first activate the feature by navigating to File->Options and settings->Options->Preview Features then check DirectQuery for SQL Server and Azure SQL Database


Once you click OK you may be prompted to restart the Power BI Desktop to utilize the feature.

Using DirectQuery in Power BI Desktop

Next make a connection either to an On-Premises SQL Server or Azure SQL database.

Go to the Home ribbon and select Get Data then SQL Server.


Provide your Server and Database names then click OK. ***Do not use a SQL statement.  It is not currently supported with DirectQuery***


From the Navigator pane choose the table(s) you would like to use.  I’m just going to pick the DimProduct table for this example and then click Load.  You could select Edit and that would launch the Query Editor where you could manipulate the extract.  This would allow you to add any business rules needed to the data before visualizing it.


Next you will be prompted to select what you want to connect to the data. Again, Import means the data

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The Big Data Blog Series

Over the last few years I’ve been speaking a lot on the subject of Big Data. I started by giving an intermediate session called “Show Me Whatcha’ Workin’ With”. This session was designed for people who had attended a one hour introductory session that showed you how to load data, to look at possible applications … Continue reading The Big Data Blog Series
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How Can I know who has changed anything in SQL?

  • 5 March 2012
  • Author: Anil
  • Number of views: 4721

Hello all,

After such a long time , I would like to post some another blog which might be helpful to the one who works in SQL.

I need to find the one who has changed the tables within my SQL Database that I have created.

For certain reason ,we may need to find /to know who has done any changes within SQL. Such as add view, delete table, modify table, create database, add column, stopped SQL agent job, create new job, modify rules, add roles, new login, and etc.

In order to trace this information and find out my solution, I have researched somewhat and find the solution as.

we can enable and disable the default trace in SQL Server. Meanwhile we can use the default trace enabled option to enable or disable the default trace log files.

If we want to capture the information about who changed the objects in SQL Server. Please try to run the script, which works for me as below:

DECLARE @filename VARCHAR(255)
SELECT @FileName = SUBSTRING(path, 0, LEN(path)-CHARINDEX('\', REVERSE(path))+1) + '\Log.trc'
FROM sys.traces
WHERE is_default = 1;

--Check who dropped and created objects, altered objects
SELECT gt.HostName,
te.Name AS EventName,
FROM [fn_trace_gettable](@filename, DEFAULT) gt
JOIN sys.trace_events te ON gt.EventClass = te.trace_event_id
where gt.ObjectName ='DimTable' and gt.DatabaseName ='Database'
ORDER BY StartTime;
 --DimTable -replace with the trace table and Database -replace with your DB

I am able to find the one who have changed my tables that I have created.

Also we should have to know that, SQL Server only shows you the IP address of the Terminal Server machine. It has no knowledge about how the user connected to that server. You would have to find the RDP logs and enter them into the database somehow to correlate the information. Which still can be inconclusive if there are more than one user connected through RDP at the same time.

I think you really need to find away to get rid of all usage of sa. What you have today is simply not good.

Reference from the link:

Is there any alternative solution for this kind of issue .Hope someone have some idea regarding on this.

Hope this post will be useful for all of us in the field of BI mainly SQL.


Anil Maharjan

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Highly motivated Business Intelligence Engineer having leadership abilities and team work skills as well as the ability to accomplish tasks under minimal direction and supervision. Has more than 5 years of development & implementation experience in HealthCare Data Analytics and Telecommunication

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